Music News

BILLY JOEL SUPPLYING SONGS FOR MOTORCYCLE MOVIE

7/16/2012

Billy Joel is shifting his love for motorcycles from the highways and back-roads of Long Island, New York to the big screen. Showbiz411.com reported that the semi-retired "Piano Man" is "organizing the soundtrack and lending his motorcycles" for the upcoming indie flick, American Dresser. Billy will serve as a consulting producer on the movie, which will shoot in Long Island and Mexico. No word on what songs will be included in the soundtrack, but it's presumed to consist of tracks from his back catalogue.

The plot synopsis for American Dresser reads:

"In this modern day western, old friends John Moore and Charlie Wildhorse are brought together by unfortunate circumstances that turn into an opportunity for both to fulfill a life long dream of riding their motorcycles West from Long Island, New York. Once on the open road the ride takes an unexpected turn, in the form of a young loner named Willie. After some problems and a few states, the three men from two very different generations slowly begin to understand one another, while learning a little something about themselves as they cross our breathtaking and diverse country. The adventures they encounter along the way will last a lifetime, while making the heart pump and the imagination run wild: 'People get older but dreams are ageless.'"

When we recently caught up with legendary producer Phil Ramone, who was behind the boards of such Billy Joel classics as The Stranger, 52nd Street, Glass Houses, The Nylon Curtain, and An Innocent Man, he told us that the film world is where Billy should be today: "What is next? What really is next? And I think a perfect place, if he were to entertain listening to this, it would be more about. . . he should write a movie score with a couple of songs and be challenged by the film and have a certain amount of control. Somebody, let's say (Martin) Scorsese or (Robert) Redford; people that would understand him. I think that would be the next thing to do, rather than trying to write six pop songs."


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